Oryx And Crake Essay Religion

The character of Crake, known in childhood as Glenn, is a genius geneticist whose plan is to create a new race of human-like creatures to replace the destructive and environmentally unfriendly Homo sapiens. Crake can be interpreted as playing god in the novel because he revels in the ability to create and destroy life. For example, when discussing extinction, he comments:

“All it takes... is the elimination of one generation. One generation of anything. Beetles,...

The character of Crake, known in childhood as Glenn, is a genius geneticist whose plan is to create a new race of human-like creatures to replace the destructive and environmentally unfriendly Homo sapiens. Crake can be interpreted as playing god in the novel because he revels in the ability to create and destroy life. For example, when discussing extinction, he comments:

“All it takes... is the elimination of one generation. One generation of anything. Beetles, trees, microbes, scientists, speakers of French, whatever. Break the link in time between one generation and the next, and it’s game over forever.”

Crake is fixated on the apparent ease of destroying life, and his own ability to exercise control over nature. Additionally, the following exchange between Crake and Oryx shows how Crake serves as a god figure for the Crakers, the human-like creatures he creates.

“Today they asked who made them.”
“And?”
“And I told them the truth. I said it was Crake. I told them he was very clever and good.”

This exchange shows how Crake is elevated to god status among the Crakers. Between his obsession with his own ability to control who lives and who dies and his status as creator of an entire race of human-like creatures, Crake exhibits a clear desire to "play god" and control nature.

This section contains 981 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)

View a FREE sample

Summary: There are many religious, Christian metaphors in Atwood's Oryx and Crake. What is most interesting to consider, though, is the idea of Snowman as the only human, as a survivor, and most importantly as a representation of the biblical `serpent'.


It is in these representations of Snowman that I believe Atwood is making a definitive statement as to whether God created man or whether man creates God. Undoubtedly Atwood is suggesting that man inevitably, despite of himself, creates God, with or without outside assistance.

It seems that throughout the novel there is an extended metaphor of Snowman as various figures from the Christian bible. The first figure that Snowman can be said to represent is that of Adam, the first man, though the similarities between the two characters do not follow the same chronology. Just as Adam is given the animals as companions to look over, similarly Crake has ensured that the Crakers and Jimmy are both left in the newly re-created world as companions.

Another strong resemblance and play on words can be observed in the Christian story of original sin and Crake's mass destruction of humanity...

(read more)

This section contains 981 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)

View a FREE sample

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *